Category Archives: Clinical Reasoning

Hypophysitis: a new member of the family

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Hypophysitis was an unusual complication in the late pregnancy and postpartum. Now, other clinicians and mainly oncologist have to think on this important problem because the new immunological treatments are associated with a low percentage (1%)  with this syndrome and the recognition could be difficult, but there is a key symptom…

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Pulmonary embolus and cancer: an image

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Pulmonary embolism, main branches

Pulmonary embolism and cancer are a very well known association, but only a high index of suspicion will help to reach the diagnosis because very often this entity appears in the context of a progressive disease in a patient with several  symptoms such as dyspnea, fever, fatigue, making the diagnosis of Pulmonary embolus a difficult task.

Abdominal cancer and gastric bypass: think in Petersen

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Prague

A diagnosis of a colorectal or ovarian cancer is a therapeutic challenge still nowadays. The treatment usually is based on a combination of surgery and chemotherapy with a clear improvement in the outcome. The follow-up of these patients is clearly established, but in some situations related to other abdominal characteristics the conclusions can be distorted

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Bone findings in cancer patients mimicking metastases (and 3)

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The path

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: To enumerate benign bone lesions detected during the staging and follow-up of patients with a diagnosis of cancer that could be misdiagnosed as bone metastases.
To show the radiological aspect of these lesions.
To define them for a better recall during the clinical reasoning process.

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