Tag Archives: diagnostic delay

Lumbalgia: an important situation for a diagnostic delay

Lumbalgia: an important situation for a diagnostic delay

 

Lumbalgia is a very common symptom in clinical practice. Although more than ninety per cent  of the occasions is associated with a benign problem,  the real challenge is to discriminate when an important disease or situation is responsible for the pain. Continue reading Lumbalgia: an important situation for a diagnostic delay

Diagnostic delay in cancer: why we can not solve the equation?

sam_2577
Amish territory

Diagnostic delay in cancer is a difficult subject to study with many confounder factors. Several papers have been published with controversial results about the relationship between delay and survival, although there is a clear tendence for a worse prognosis with longer delays. We will expose some of the confounder factors and biases that can interact with the association between  delay and survival.

Continue reading Diagnostic delay in cancer: why we can not solve the equation?

How can we define delay in cancer?

Clary St., Boston, by Lourdes Alonso

The time between symptom recognition and a definitive diagnosis have been described in many terms including ‘Time-to-Diagnosis’ (TtD), delay to diagnosis, pre-diagnostic interval and duration of symptoms in the literature [6] and we will use TtD across this paper. The concept of the term “delay” assumes that there is an ideal period of time to arrive to a diagnosis in a patient with cancer

Continue reading How can we define delay in cancer?

Time to Diagnosis of Ewing Tumors in Children and Adolescents Is Not Associated With Metastasis or Survival

JCO

 

Letter published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology about a previous article where Time to Diagnosis (TtD) is not associated with outcome. We reply about the possibility of a “representativeness bias” because doctors relate bone pain in young adolescents with growth.

QCancer: an approach to improve cancer diagnosis for general practitioners

Diapositiva1

Cancer diagnosis is difficult in the primary care setting because many symptoms are common for tumors and benign conditions. This is more complicated with healthy patients or for young people.

A large analysis of data implemented in UK is the base for the development of a tool called “QCancer” , a model for men and women that estimate risks of multiple cancers according to baseline risk factors, patterns of symptoms and specific clinical conditions.

The tool is available free at www.QCancer.org